Featured Stories

We are participating in the conversation about equitable and
resilient public health and sanitation systems.

Swiss Economist Backs Us Up: Portlanders Pay too Much for Sanitation

Writes Molly Danielsson, who, along with Mathew Lippincott, has received a stipend at Cewas in Switzerland.  Part of a group of entrepreneurs launching sanitation businesses, they are meeting and interviewing experts in the field.  Watch this space for reports of their discoveries. Mat and I had a chance to hear Isabel Guenther speak on May 24th on the dynamics of sanitation and water investments as part of the Cewas program in  Swizerland.  Guenther is Professor of Development Economics at the Center for Development and Cooperation (NADEL) at the Swiss Federal Insitiute of Technology in Zurich (EGH). Guenther found that people are willing to spend 1% of their income on sanitation services.  The average household in Portland spends $640 per year on sewer fees.  The median Portland household income in 2008 was $50,165.  Portlanders thus spend 1.3% of their income on sewer fees, this explains why the number two complaint to the mayor’s office is sewer rates.  I guess that’s what happens when folks are paying 30% more than they’re willing to pay. Here’re the facts on Portland and on median household income.  


From the Blog

Public Restrooms and COVID-19: Guidelines for Reopening

June 29, 2020 The re-opening of the economy during the continuing COVID-19 pandemic depends on the successful re-opening of toilet facilities. Retail businesses, manufacturing firms, trade workshops, food-processing units, schools and universities, and government institutions must protect people from the SARS-CoV-2 virus. And they are in a position to support…

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There’s plenty of toilet paper in the US – so why are people hoarding it?

Almost 150 U.S. companies make toilet paper. Studio Dagdagaz/Shutterstock.com Jay L. Zagorsky, Boston University The other day I went into Costco to buy some toilet paper. It came as a small shock when I couldn’t find a single roll. The new coronavirus is inspiring panic buying of a variety of household products such as…

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The POOP Project is coming to Portland 2/22/2020!

Straight from New York City, The POOP Project is coming to Portland! How do you break the potty taboo and catalyze creative conversation about sustainable sanitation for the person, planet and world community?  The People’s Own Organic Power (POOP) Project​ has been showing us how, using a brilliant combination of theater,…

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